Ethics of the Dust - Edward Lyttelton

Edward Lyttelton

Biography

Rev. Hon. Edward Lyttelton (1855-1942)

Edward Lyttelton was born on 23 July 1855, in Westminster, London, England, to George Lyttelton, 4th Baron Lyttelton (1817-1876), and Mary Glynne (1813-1857), daughter of Sir Stephen Glynne, 8th Baronet. Together, they had twelve children, eight sons and four daughters: Meriel Sarah (1840-1925), Lucy Caroline (1841-1925), Charles, 8th Viscount Cobham (1842-1922) who succeeded their father, Rev. Albert Victor (1844-1928), Neville Gerald (1845-1931), George William Spencer (1847-1913), Lavinia (1849-1939), May (1850-1875), Arthur Temple (1852-1903), Robert Henry (1854-1939), Edward, and Alfred (1857-1913). Edward was the seventh son and the second youngest child. His mother, Mary, would pass away after Edward’s youngest brother Alfred was born, in 1857. In 1869, George would marry Sybella Harriet Clive, daughter of George Clive, and have three daughters: Sarah Kathleen (1870-1942), Sybil (1873-1934), and Hester Margaret (1874-1958).

Edward attended Eton College and continued his education at Trinity College, Cambridge. There he played first class cricket, where he was one of five of the Lyttelton brothers to play; they included Charles, George, Arthur, Robert, and Alfred. In 1878, Edward was the captain of Cambridge’s cricket team and he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts. During his cricket career, Edward earned a Blue, an award for university athletes, and played for Middlesex, the Gentlemen cricket team, I Zingari, the Marylebone Cricket Club, and the South of England cricket team.

From 1880-1882, Edward became the assistant master at Wellington College and would graduate with a Master of Arts, in 1881. He left Wellington College in 1882 and became the assistant master at his alma mater, Eton College. Edward became an ordained deacon in 1884 from Oxford and then an ordained priest in 1886 from Cuddesdon College. On 21 December 1888, he married Caroline Amy West (1873-1919), and they had two daughters together Nora Joan (1890-1965) and Deila (1892-1964).

In 1890, Edward left Eton College and became the Headmaster at Haileybury College. He was also the chaplain of the Bishop of St. Albans, from 1892-1903, and during this time, from 1895-1905, he had the title of canon for the St. Albans Cathedral. In 1894, Edward’s passion for education had him becoming the Chairman for the Council of the Teacher’s Guild and a member of the Royal Commission on Secondary Education. He would also become a member of the Consultative Committee of the Board of Education in 1900.

In 1905, Edward left Haileybury College and returned to Eton College as the Headmaster. While at Eton College, Edward obtained a Bachelor of Divinity in 1907 and a Doctor of Divinity, in 1912. He was also an advocate for co-education and changing the prerequisites for students to enter the college. He was also responsible for students being able to specialize in history, mathematics, modern languages, and science during his time at Eton.

In March 1915, Edward gave a controversial sermon at St. Margaret’s, in Westminster. His sermon was during World War I and he preached not all Germans should be to blame and forgiveness should be given. There was much public protest and eventually in 1916, he resigned from his post as Headmaster at Eton College.

After resigning, he became the parish priest at St. Martin-in-the-Fields, and from 1918-1920, he was the rector of a small village parish Sidestrand, in Norfolk. Edward would go back to teaching in 1920, where he became the Dean of Whitelands College, Chelsea, a women’s college for teacher training. He also acted as Chaplain and lecturer of the Bible for the college.

Edward retired from teaching in 1929 and moved to Norwich. Unfortunately, in 1930, Edward was hit by a car in London after delivering a sermon at Sion College. He sustained injuries to his head, hand, leg, and he was also unconscious for two hours but was able to return home the next day.

For ten years, 1931-1941, Edward would be granted the title of honorary canon of Norwich.

On 23 January 1942, Edward Lyttelton passed away at The Old Palace, in Lincoln; he was aged 86 years.

In UPEI’s Provenance Collection the book, Ethics of the dust: ten lectures to little housewives on the elements of crystallization by John Ruskin has a bookplate to student “Geraldo W. Deighton” from “E. Lyttelton” dated 1908.


Sources:

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1861. Data imaged from The National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU.

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU.

“Ireland, Civil Registration Indexes 1845–1958,” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah. General Register Office, Republic of Ireland. "Quarterly Returns of Marriages in Ireland with Index to Marriages.".

Principal Probate Registry. Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England. London, England © Crown copyright.

Venn, J. A., comp.. Alumni Cantabrigienses. London, England: Cambridge University Press, 1922-1954.

Autograph Letter Signed from a Reverend teaching at Eton College during World War I. by Edward Lyttelton on Between the Covers. Retrieved from
https://www.betweenthecovers.com/pages/books/414542/edward-lyttelton/autograph-letter-signed-from-a-reverend-teaching-at-eton-college-during-world-war-i

Goodwin, Chris & Isherwood, Glen. (1999-2018). “Edward Lyttelton”. England Football Online. Retrieved from http://www.englandfootballonline.com/TeamPlyrsBios/PlayersL/BioLyttletonE.html

“Lyttelton, the Hon. Edward (LTLN874E)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.

Geneanet. Family tree of Mary Glynne. Retrieved from https://gw.geneanet.org/orions8?lang=en&p=mary&n=glynne

Geneanet. Family tree of Caroline Amy West. Retrieved from https://gw.geneanet.org/orions8?lang=en&p=caroline amy&n=west

Photo:

Description: Alfred Lyttelton (left) & his older brother Edward Lyttelton at Eton
Date: circa 1872
Source: Andrew Wallis (family photograph)
Author: Hill & Saunders

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